Ukraine attracting Swedes

Trade Minister for Ukraine Nataliya Mykolska is in Stockholm to attract Swedish companies to Ukraine. The selling points are low wages, speedy reforms and an EU agreement.

She says areas of priority are food, light industry, timber, furniture and IT. She also sees potential in tourism. She says the government has also worked hard to counter corruption, saying that more has been done in the past three years than in the preceding 25 years.

Sweden keen to step up pressure on Putin

Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Löfven will land in Kiev later today for talks with Ukraine’s President Petro Poroshenko and Prime Minister Arseniy Yatseenyuk. He will also meet the leader of the Crimean Tatar community in order to highlight the fact that Sweden does not accept Russia’s annexation of Crimea.

During his day-long visit, Mr Löfven will sign a bilateral agreement to boost reform but much of the Swedish PM’s day will be spent discussing the situation in Eastern Ukraine and what EU member states can do to put pressure on Russia to establish a permanent ceasefire.

Mr Löfven will present the findings of his meeting in Kiev when EU heads of state and government meet next week to discuss Russia and Ukraine. Despite pressure from some members to ease or drop sanctions, the EU is currently united in its stance to maintain sanctions against Russia. Sweden’s stance is that the sanctions should remain in place as long as there are no tangible signs that the situation in Eastern Ukraine is improving. Sweden also believes that member states should be prepared to ratchet up pressure on Russia, with further sanctions.