Ingves: currency intervention not first choice

Appearing before the Committee on Finance yesterday, Riksbank Governor Stefan Ingves tried to pour oil on troubled waters when he said a strong krona was unwelcome news in the current situation. Afterwards, he told the media that it would be helpful if the krona remained at current levels, in terms of bringing up inflation to the 2 per cent target.

Ingves also said the central bank was prepared to take further measures, although currency intervention was not his first choice.

Govt plans to force operators to co-operate

IT Minister Mehmet Kaplan’s dream is that 90 per cent of Swedish households will have 100 Mbit/s access by 2020. Estimates suggest his plans could cost up to 40 billion kronor to realise.

In a move to reduce the cost, Kaplan proposes that broadband operators should be bound by law to open up their infrastructure to competitors wishing to expand in the same region.

Kaplan also proposes that the Swedish Post and Telecom Agency be given the powers to decide disputes regarding cables and land.

His plans will now be circulated for comment, after which the minister hopes the legislation will come into force on 1 July 2016.

Major operators up in arms

Plans by the Swedish Post and Telecom Authority (PTS) to ensure telecom service providers provide continuity of service in the event of a power outage have infuriated the industry. TeliaSonera claims that back-up solutions would cost the operator hundreds of millions of kronor to put in place, while estimates suggest that Tele2 would have to invest half a billion kronor to provide such resilience.

Employer organisation the Swedish IT and Telecom Industries estimates the industry would need to invest two billion kronor in order to meet the criteria.

35,000 affected by Norwegian strike

Late Tuesday evening, the airline Norwegian said it was cancelling all domestic flights in Sweden, Norway and Denmark because of the pilot strike. More than 35,000 passengers will be affected.

The airline has also cancelled all flights between the Scandinavian capitals. Some flights to European destinations may also be affected. Long-haul flights to the US and Thailand will operate as normal.

Norwegian has said it will lay off 800 flight attendants as of today, Wednesday.

Kristersson opposes removal of target

Ulf Kristersson, the Moderates’ spokesman on economic policy, is against the government’s plans to remove the budget surplus target of 1% over a business cycle, saying such a move would impair Sweden’s ability to pursue an active fiscal policy during a financial crisis. He also warns that a deficit could build up very quickly, if the target is abolished.

Abolition of surplus target long awaited

Swedish economists have welcomed the centre-left government’s plans to remove the country’s budget surplus target and replace it with a balanced budget target to free up money for important investments in education, infrastructure and the like. However, SEB chief economist Robert Bergvist warns that greater financial discipline will need to be imposed during such a transition, otherwise there is an overhanging risk of an operating deficit.

Five-years for crimes against international law

A 28-year-old Syrian man accused of crimes against international law has been sentenced to five years in jail, and is now only the third person ever in Sweden to be convicted of war crimes. “Overall we are pleased with the ruling. We find that the court has made the same judgment as we have,” says Hanna Lemoine, prosecutor, and described the case as one with several difficulties.
The critical evidence was a film of a brutal beating (see SPR 26 February, Midday Ed.) that took place in Syria in 2012 and was uploaded to social media. Hans Brun, researcher into terrorism at Kind’s College, now hopes that the ruling will have importance in the future. “Then the major problem is those who return to Sweden from war zones and who cannot be convicted. Parliament and the government must consider this issue appropriately.” [http://www.svd.se/nyheter/inrikes/fem-ars-fangelse- for-folkrattsbrott-i-syrien_4363965.svd Accessed 2015-02-27 08.53]

Löfven and Merkel agree on refugee issue

During their meeting in Berlin yesterday Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Löfven and German Chancellor Angela Merkel agreed that they shared common interests in terms of migration and integration, and said they would now call for a fairer distribution of the refugee burden in the European Union. The two heads of government also discussed the crisis in Ukraine and relations with Russia, agreeing that diplomacy must be given a chance to succeed. However, neither rule out the possibility of new sanctions, if the truce is broken.

(SvD I: 10, DN I: 16)